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Meet the Elephants

View additional elephant information here: Studbooks contain information such as year of birth, place of birth, wild captures, current location of, and all transfers for Asian and African elephants living in North America.

North American Region Studbook for the African Elephant (Loxodonta africana)

North American Region Studbook for the Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus)

 

ELEPHANT ADOPTIONS MAKE GREAT HOLIDAY GIFTS! Click here for more information.

 

 

 

 


IRINGA

$200 Annual Adoption*

 

 


TOKA

$200 Annual Adoption*

 

 


THIKA

$200 Annual Adoption*

 

 

THE TORONTO ELEPHANTS

 

Iringa (African Elephant, Loxodonta africana)

Born in 1969 in Mozambique, Iringa is an African elephant who was captured at age two after her mother was killed in a cull (the systematic killing of elephants in order to reduce an elephant population). She was sold to the Toronto Zoo by an animal dealer and arrived at the Zoo on November 1, 1974, the year the zoo opened. Iringa is the oldest of the three Toronto elephants. She and the others arrived at ARK 2000 on October 20, 2013.

Iringa made a graceful exit from her transport crate, as she stepped onto California soil for the first time, and she has been at ease in her new home ever since. She especially likes to explore mud holes, tossing mud onto her belly and back. She can be easily identified by a large notch in her right ear. The Toronto Zoo board voted in May 2011 to end the Zoo's elephant program and send the elephants to another facility. In October 2011, the Toronto City Council voted to move the elephants to PAWS, where they will enjoy year-round access to their new, expansive natural habitat.

 

 

 

Toka (African Elephant, Loxodonta africana)

Born in 1970 in Mozambique, Toka is an African elephant who was captured in 1972 and acquired by the Toronto Zoo on September 4, 1974. She was among the first group of elephants to arrive at the newly opened zoo. Like Iringa, she was orphaned after her mother was killed in a cull, and was sold to the Toronto Zoo by an animal dealer. Toka made her way to PAWS with Thika and Iringa, arriving at ARK 2000 on October 20, 2013. The Toronto Zoo board voted in May 2011 to end the zoo's elephant program and send the elephants to another facility. In October 2011, the Toronto City Council voted to move the elephants to PAWS.

It’s easy to identify Toka, with her elegant, long tusks. She is the most adventuresome of the three elephants. Toka likes to grab a bundle of hay and tuck it under one of her tusks – then she snacks on it as she walks.

 

 

 

 

 

Thika (African Elephant, Loxodonta africana)

Thika (pronounced “Teeka”), an African elephant, was born at the Toronto Zoo on October 18, 1980. Her mother was Tequila and her father was Tantor. Thika lost her mother in 2008, when Tequila was age 38 (female offspring naturally remain with their mothers for life). Tantor died in 1989 at only 20 years old. Thika’s birth was followed three years later by the arrival of a sister, Tumpe, who was transferred to another zoo at the age of three. Thika arrived at PAWS with elephants Toka and Iringa, who are not related to her.

The Toronto Zoo board voted in May 2011 to end the zoo's elephant program and send the elephants to another facility. In October 2011, the Toronto City Council voted to move the elephants to PAWS.

Thika is the youngest and the tallest of the three elephants. She, Iringa and Toka are all enjoying the fresh vegetation that’s readily available to them. Thika has only ever known life in a zoo environment, so it will be exciting to see her explore and adapt to her new natural-habitat home.

 

 

 

The Toronto Elephants: PAWS Photo Albums

Album #1 "The Journey" - view here

Album #2 "First 30 Days" - view here


 


PRINCE

$200 Annual Adoption*

 

PRINCE (Asian Elephant, Elephas maximus)

Prince (Chang Dee) arrived at PAWS on July 21, 2011. Upon arrival, he threw dirt for two hours, ate like a fiend, had a drink, then laid on his dirt pile and went to sleep.

Prince is a retired circus elephant donated voluntarily to PAWS, at its request, by Feld Entertainment, the parent company of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey. He was born on May 24, 1987, at the Portland Zoo — part of their highly touted captive breeding program. Prince's mother was Me-tu, also born at Portland Zoo; his father was Hugo.

Prince loves his habitat at ARK 2000, especially the pool. He is in and out of his pool all day, ending each of his forays down the hill with a 20- or 30-minute dip. He has also learned to pull branches out of the oak trees. One week we observed him challenging one of the smaller trees to a game of "shove." The tree lost, but will ultimately keep growing.

 

THE ARRIVAL OF PRINCE: View Here

DAY 2: Introduction to outdoor yard and pool: View Here

DAY 2: Introduction to large habitat: View Here

FIRST DAY IN HIS POOL: View Here

Prince loves his pool! View Here

 


ANNIE

$200 Annual Adoption*

 

ANNIE (Asian Elephant, Elephas maximus)

Annie was captured in Assam, India, in January, 1959. She was part of a group of 18 juvenile elephants captured at a natural salt lick that had attracted the herd. The hunting party built a "round stockade" of logs with a tunnel leading from the stockade. The party of five assistant hunters and 60 natives waited until the herd arrived, then, with torches and shouts, they drove the animals into the stockade.

After her capture, Annie and her close companion, Tamara, shared an elephant barn/enclosure with two other elephants at the Milwaukee Zoo until 1994, when video taped recordings of cruel beatings and abusive training elicited public demands that the two elephants be sent to the PAWS sanctuary. They arrived in 1995.

Tamara and Annie enjoyed a peaceful retirement in a large, grassy, tree-lined enclosure at the PAWS sanctuary in Galt, California, until Tamara’s death in 2002. In an effort to alleviate Annie’s enormous grief over the loss of her companion, PAWS staff moved Annie to ARK 2000 in 2002.

Today Annie, who has a history of arthritis (as do most elderly captive elephants), is one of the most active of the older Asian elephants. She spends her days roaming and grazing among the trees, swimming in the lake, dusting and mud-bathing before lying down to sleep on a sunny hillside.

 

ANNNIE SWIMMING IN HER LAKE:  View Here

 


GYPSY

$200 Annual Adoption*



GYPSY (Asian Elephant, Elephas maximus)

Nicholas and his surrogate mother, GYPSY, arrived in Galt on April 2, 2007. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Hawthorn Corporation negotiated a consent agreement which permitted the transfer of the two Asian elephants to PAWS. The two elephants were closely bonded and their devotion to each other was indescribably touching. They shared food, rumbled, chirped and remained in close proximity to each other at all times.

When we accepted the responsibility of caring for Nicholas & Gypsy, we knew that dealing with the relationship between the young male and his older female companion would be challenging. When Nicholas matured and his hormones became an issue, separation would be inevitable.

When it came time to separate the two, on January 13, 2009, we knew it was the end of an era, a time when the young, captive born male no longer needed a surrogate mother. Gypsy had provided security, safety and wisdom to him as long as she could. In the wild, he would be sent out to follow older bulls and learn the ritual that all elephants understand.

We moved Gypsy down the hill to join the other Asian elephants where she's been given a much deserved rest and retirement after the daunting task of raising a young bull. When Gypsy moved to the Asian barn, she gravitated to Wanda immediately. When she made her first trips out to the habitat, she stayed close to Wanda, and since that time the two have remained almost inseparable.

Several weeks after Gypsy's move we were reviewing 20 year old circus videos, searching for footage of Ruby when she performed in the circus. What we found was astonishing — no footage of Ruby, but we did find Nicholas’ father Tunga, Gypsy, Gypsy’s calf (Brat, now deceased), and Wanda!

Sadly, circus elephants have little solace in their lives except for the comfort of other elephants, and they never forget old friends, even after more than 20 years. Gypsy and Wanda — best friends forever.

Gypsy was born in 1967.


GYPSY & WANDA

FROM THE CIRCUS, TO PAWS:  View Here

NAP TIME FOR GYPSY: View Here

WANDA & GYPSY GO FOR A SWIM: View Here



LULU

$200 Annual Adoption*



LULU (African Elephant, Loxodonta africana)

In March of 2005, African elephant Lulu, then 38, arrived at PAWS ARK 2000 sanctuary from the San Francisco Zoo. The journey, only her second trip since 1968, when she was captured in Swaziland and moved to San Francisco at the age of 2.

When Lulu first arrived, she had a habit of covering herself with feces and throwing feces inside her barn and at her keepers; happily, she no longer engages in this behavior and is much calmer with people.

Psychologically, we have observed many important changes in Lulu's attitude toward the other elephants. When she first arrived, our greatest challenge was alleviating her fear of 71 and Mara and her anxiety when she felt trapped inside any area. When we released her into the big habitat, she stayed outside all night and hesitated at the gate on coming back in. Realizing these fears were deep seated, we concentrated on moving her slowly through gates and into different areas, giving her ample time and space to comfortably choose to move through a gate and allow it to close behind her. Lulu had the long hallway in the middle of the inside stalls which enabled her to approach 71 and Mara whenever she chose and to retreat at will. This became an excellent tool for her socialization with the other elephants. She became totally bonded with them and stopped squatting when they approached. We were very cautious with this process because of her past history with an overly dominant female and our desire to allow her to socialize without stress.

We constantly remind all who are interested in elephants and their welfare of the complexity of their society and the challenges which are created by captivity. All moves are stressful to elephants who have an inherent need for functioning social order and close companions, and change is seldom easy.

 

We are quite pleased with Lulu's adaptation to her new home and friends; she is a truly remarkable elephant and is loved by both elephants and humans at PAWS.

 

1968, LULU'S ARRIVAL

AT THE SAN FRANCISCO ZOO: VIEW HERE

 


Donate to the
"71" Memorial Fund



"71"(African Elephant, Loxodonta africana)

IN MEMORIAM: 1982-2008

 

PAWS’ Beloved Elephant Passes Away

71, one of PAWS’ cherished African elephants, peacefully passed away in September of 2008.  Her PAWS family was with her.  She was 26 years old.

71 was born in Africa and shipped to the United States after her mother was killed in a cull (the systematic killing of adult elephants by the government in order to control populations encroaching upon human civilization). Assigned and tagged #71, and slated to be sold as a baby circus elephant, she and a few others in the group ended up being purchased by millionaire Arthur Jones, inventor of Nautilus exericise equipment, who owned a large estate in Ocala, Florida. Without her mother’s care 71 was malnourished, chronically sick and nearly died. In an attempt to save her young life, Pat Derby and Ed Stewart offered to give her sanctuary.

 

Pat and Ed transported the tiny elephant to the Galt sanctuary in August of 1986. When 71 first arrived at PAWS her veterinarian said she would never be a healthy elephant. But Pat and Ed committed themselves to giving her a chance. They slept with her for months, and bottle fed her until she was strong enough to eat on her own. They gave her love and encouragement. They gave her a family.

 

“When 71 first arrived and walked out of her crate,” Derby recalls, “we immediately cut the chains from around her neck. We promised her right then she would never again be chained. She would never be beaten. She would never have to do anything she didn’t want to do. We kept that promise to her.”

At PAWS, 71 lived a rich and full life, unchained and free for the next 23 years. As she grew, Pat, Ed and PAWS provided her with freedom and companions. 71 was the driving force behind PAWS and its elephant program, and she and her companion Mara were the subjects of Pat’s book, “In the Presence of Elephants,” first published in October of 1995. She led the African elephant group, as well as Pat, Ed and PAWS through the years. She was loved, admired and respected by all who knew her, and every program at PAWS evolved because of her.

 

“Ed and I built ARK 2000 for 71, and all our programs were developed from our experiences with her. Without 71, there would be no PAWS,” Pat Derby has stated. “She lived in an atmosphere of love, peace and dignity, and she led her group of elephants with wisdom and courage. She will always be the cornerstone of PAWS and the elephant sanctuary at ARK 2000.”

 

Captivity, and the practice of capturing elephants—tearing them away from their families, forcing them to live in confined spaces, often cruelly trained—is ultimately what destroys them. “I hope everyone who hears 71’s story will remember her when they see elephants languishing in small spaces, rocking and swaying, deprived of their freedom and their families,” Derby said.

 

71'S ARRIVAL IN GALT: View Here

VIEW: 71's photo gallery HERE »

 

(Necropsy results indicated chronic pancreatitis as the cause of death. This is an inflammation of the pancreas over many years. The University of California at Davis pathology laboratory in San Bernardino also noted the condition was probably a result of her early medical problems. There were no obstructions and her liver and kidneys were normal. Pathologists assured PAWS there was nothing that could have been done to save her.

When 71 arrived at PAWS in 1986, her colic attacks were occurring two to three times a week. Veterinarians warned PAWS founders, Pat Derby and Ed Stewart, at that time that these attacks could be fatal. 71 was four years old when she arrived in Galt. She weighed 482 pounds — a normal weight for a four-month-old calf. When Pat and Ed found her she was living at the veterinary hospital at the University of Florida. Her primary veterinarians at the University had written a paper on the young elephant’s recurring problems with malabsorption. The prognosis at that time was bleak; the veterinarians did not expect 71 to survive.)

 


MAGGIE

$200 Annual Adoption*


MAGGIE (African Elephant, Loxodonta africana)

Maggie is an African elephant who lived at the Alaska Zoo, in Anchorage, for 24 years.

Born in Zimbabwe, Africa, Maggie was captured in 1981 after her mother was shot in a cull (the systematic killing of adult elephants by the government in order to control populations encroaching upon human civilization), and brought to the Alaska Zoo in 1983. After arriving at the Alaska Zoo Maggie became a companion for Annabelle, an Asian elephant. Sadly, Annabelle passed away in December of 1997 and left Maggie alone — the only elephant in Alaska.

Following an impassioned public outcry, the Alaska Zoo board of directors voted to move Maggie to a warmer climate. On Nov. 1, 2007, the 27-year-old elephant was crated and put aboard one of the largest cargo jets made, on loan from the United States Air Force, and flown 2,000 miles to California. Maggie's friend Bob Barker paid for her flight.

Today Maggie is enjoying the warm California weather, expansive habitat and African elephant friends Mara and Lulu. Maggie continues to captivate her keepers and entrance her fellow elephants. She manipulates and cons her elephant friends who allow her to break all the rules and have her way about everything. They treat her like a young calf and indulge her shamelessly as she bats her eyes and prances in and out of the group stealing all the best treats and the best spots at the mud holes.

MAGGIE'S MIGRATION,

From Alaska to ARK 2000: VIEW HERE

THE BIG DAY ARRIVES; Maggie joins her group: VIEW HERE

MAGGIE HEADS FOR THE LAKE: VIEW HERE

MAGGIE'S FIRST TREE: VIEW HERE

 


MARA

$200 Annual Adoption*

MARA(African Elephant, Loxodonta africana)

Mara was born in Africa in 1982, and shipped to the U.S. after her mother was killed in a cull (the systematic killing of adult elephants by the government in order to control populations encroaching upon human civilization).

She spent her first few years at San Jose's Happy Hollow Zoo, until her owner threatened to sell her to a circus in Mexico. A group of her admirers, calling themselves "Friends of Mara", raised $20,000 to buy her and made arrangements for her to be flown from San Jose to Florida, to the rambling 600-acre estate of millionaire Arthur Jones, inventor of Nautilus exericise equipment. Jones' estate was already home to more than 80 elephants.

Within a year's time Mara faced the auction block again, slated to be sold to a circus when Jones began selling off his herd. Pat Derby and Ed Stewart had already rescued a sickly little elephant named 71 from the Ocala, FL estate a few years earlier, and after alerting Friends of Mara to their elephant's fate, were now making plans to move Mara to the PAWS' Galt Sanctuary.

Mara, now 8 years old, arrived on January 23, 1990. Fundraising began to build a new barn and a larger habitat for the Galt, California, elephant herd.

After an introductory period where they were kept separated, but got to eye and trumpet at each other, 71 and Mara were soon sharing the same habitat where they would run from one end to the other, swim in the lake, spar with each other, toss tires, and push logs. A far cry from the life they would have lived in a circus, had fate not stepped in. They were together until 71's death in September of 2008.

ED STEWART VISITS WITH MARA,

and the other African elephants: VIEW HERE


 


 

In Memory of Minnie

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MINNIE (Asian Elephant, Elephas maximus)

IN MEMORIAM: 1955-2009

 

For the last few months of her life, Minnie had been experiencing a recurrence of her urinary tract infections and bladder problems which had plagued her for years.

During her last bout, Minnie refused most food and water except for cranberry sauce and cereal. We hand fed and watered her, and administered necessary medications at two hour intervals around the clock. We were all concerned that we might lose our beloved Minnie.

Miraculously, once again, she began eating and drinking on her own. During the month of January, she made incredible strides toward recovery, and we were optimistic that she would have one more summer in the lake with her friends.

On Wednesday, January 21, 2009, she had her very best day, playing with Rebecca and chirping and squeaking at her keepers who were delighted to see her joyful behavior. Ed Stewart, one of her favorite people, spent most of the day with her, and Pat Derby fed her buckets of her favorite treats. Ed gave her a very warm bath, and she spent several hours throwing dirt, chirping and thumping. Everyone was delighted with her progress.

Minnie and Rebecca went into their dirt stall in the barn, and ate hay and dusted in the late afternoon. At 6 p.m. afternoon keeper, Jon, served meals to Minnie and Rebecca, and Minnie devoured every bit. As Jon stood there warming up water for their drink, Minnie laid down and seemed to be going off to sleep. Jon called softly to her, then realized she had stopped breathing.

Minnie, our 54-year-old circus retiree, whose vocalizations and sweet disposition charmed everyone at ARK 2000, died peacefully in her barn with Rebecca, her long time companion, and Pat Derby, Ed Stewart and her keepers at her side. Her peaceful posture and the serenity with which she slipped away were a great comfort to all of us. Minnie, who had endured years chained in railroad cars, died tranquilly among her friends.

We take comfort in our loss knowing that her last days afforded the peace and dignity which this great lady deserved.

We will miss you, Minnie.

 

MINNIE MEMORIAL VIDEO: View Here

(Minnie was born in India in 1955 and captured by animal dealers and brought to the U.S. in the late 1950s. She had three owners before she joined the Ringling Bros. herd in 1987. She traveled with the Blue Unit of Ringling Bros. until July 2000. Minnie then retired to the Ringling Bros. Center for Elephant Conservation in Central Florida. She and Rebecca were brought to PAWS in September 2001 as part of a mutual agreement between PAWS and the circus.)

 


NICHOLAS

$200 Annual Adoption*

NICHOLAS(Asian Elephant, Elephas maximus)

Nicholas was a 13-year-old bull elephant when he arrived at our Galt Sanctuary on April 2, 2007. He was born on December 15, 1993, at a circus breeding facility, then separated from his mother before he was two years old. He was trained to ride a tricycle and performed in a circus at that age. The circus retired him when he became to difficult to manage at the young age of five.

Nicholas lived with Gypsy (see above), an unrelated female, who was his constant companion for nine years. The two shared a single stall until their transfer to our Galt sanctuary where they remained in mandated quarantine for one year. They were then moved to their new home at ARK 2000. When they arrived in Galt, their obvious devotion to each other triggered our decision to keep them together for as long as possible.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Hawthorn Corporation negotiated a consent agreement which permitted the transfer of the two Asian elephants to PAWS. The two elephants were closely bonded and their devotion to each other was indescribably touching. They shared food, rumbled, chirped and remained in close proximity to each other at all times.

When we accepted the responsibility of caring for Nicholas & Gypsy, we knew that dealing with the relationship between the young male and his older female companion would be challenging. When Nicholas matured and his hormones became an issue, separation would be inevitable.

When it came time to separate the two, on January 13, 2009, we knew it was the end of an era, a time when the young, captive born male no longer needed a surrogate mother. Gypsy had provided security, safety and wisdom to him as long as she could. In the wild, he would be sent out to follow older bulls and learn the ritual that all elephants understand.

We moved Gypsy down the hill to join the other Asian elephants where she's been given a much deserved rest and retirement after the daunting task of raising a young bull.

Nicholas is now a neighbor to Prince, PAWS' other bull elephant.

 

NICHOLAS PERFORMING ON A TRICYCLE: VIEW HERE

NICHOLAS & GYPSY move to ARK 2000: VIEW HERE

NICHOLAS' FIRST DAY

in his new habitat: VIEW HERE

NICHOLAS PLAYS in his lake: VIEW HERE

BATH TIME ON BULL MOUNTAIN: VIEW HERE

NEW BARN, FRESH DIRT: VIEW HERE

 

Help bull elephants like Nicholas and Prince.

Join PAWS "Bucks for Bulls" campaign today!

 

 

 

In Memory of Ruby

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RUBY(African Elephant, Loxodonta africana)

IN MEMORIAM: 2/18/1961-3/29/2011

 

Ruby, the gentle matriarch

of PAWS African elephants

Arriving at PAWS in May, 2007, Ruby, at 46 years old, had been a traveling elephant much of her life. As a baby she was taken from the African wild and trained to perform with Circus Vargas until 1987 when she was sent to the Los Angeles Zoo. She lived there with Gita, an Asian elephant, until 2003 when she was sent to the Knoxville Zoo in Tennessee. 18 months later, after that did not work out, Ruby returned to the Los Angeles Zoo, until the zoo made the decision to move her to PAWS in 2007.

At nearly 9,000 pounds and nine feet tall at the withers, Ruby was squat and built like a tank, with big brown eyes and a sweet disposition.

After nearly four decades in the public eye, Ruby was finally allowed to retire and spent her last years roaming the pastures and hillsides of ARK 2000 with other African elephant companions.

After the death of 71, Ruby became the respected and beloved matriarch of the African group over the next few years, and was often seen on top of the hill, ears flared, guarding her companions with the fierce determination of a wild elephant matriarch.

Everyone who worked with Ruby was mesmerized by her beautiful eyes and her gentle disposition. She will be missed by elephants, caregivers and her many fans who were privileged to share her life.

At 50 years of age, Ruby was one of the oldest African elephants in captivity.

Rest in peace dear friend.

 

To view PAWS tribute to Ruby, CLICK HERE.

LIFE WITHOUT RUBY: How Mara, Maggie and Lulu

are coping with the loss of their matriarch. CLICK HERE


 

In Memory of Sabu

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SABU (Asian Elephant, Elephas maximus)

IN MEMORIAM: 10/1/1982-1/11/2012

Sabu, the gentle giant, succumbed to the effects of severe arthritis in multiple joints and died on Wednesday, January 11, 2012. To view our video tribute to Sabu, CLICK HERE.

Sabu was a seven ton Asian bull elephant, and 28 years old when he arrived at ARK 2000 in September, 2010. He was half brother to Nicholas.

Sabu was a retired circus elephants donated voluntarily to PAWS, at its request, by Feld Entertainment, the parent company of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey. Sabu was born at the Portland Zoo and traveled with Ringling Bros. when he was younger. Since retiring from performing a number of years ago, Sabu had been living at one of Ringling Bros.’ retirement facilities in Florida.

Sabu was as calm and sweet as Nicholas. He was indeed magnificent! Rest in peace sweet boy.

 

SABU ARRIVES AT ARK 2000: View Here

TOUR SABU'S BARN & HABITAT: View Here

SABU, FIRST DAY IN HIS LARGE HABITAT: View Here

SABU SPLASHES IN HIS POOL: View Here

SABU EXPLORES HIS HABITAT: View Here

SABU, THE DISAPPEARING ELEPHANT: View Here

MOVING SABU TO HIS NEW BARN: VIEW HERE

 

Help bull elephants.

Join PAWS "Bucks for Bulls" campaign today!


WANDA

$200 Annual Adoption*



WANDA (Asian Elephant, Elephas maximus)

After a 3-day journey that took them across the country, Wanda, then 47 years old, and Winky, 43 (see below), two Asian elephants from the Detroit Zoo, arrived safely at ARK 2000 early Friday morning, April 8, 2005. A caravan of their keepers and caregivers, veterinarians and other staff and a large array of their favorite toys accompanied them.

Detroit Zoo Director Ron Kagan’s choice to send Wanda and Winky to ARK 2000 in 2004, is still reverberating in the zoo industry years later, and marked the latest twist in a long, often clumsy, historical shift , from animals caged for our delight, to a more enlightened conservation message, and finally to the notion that zoos can actually change human behavior by teaching us about the ways we’re damaging the natural world.

 

The Detroit Zoo was the nation's first major animal facility to give away its elephants solely on ethical grounds. When Detroit Zoo made the controversial decision to send two Asian elephants to ARK 2000, they also made a commitment to assist and support PAWS in the care of the elephants. In the years since the elephants arrived, staff, veterinarians and administrators from the zoo have visited their beloved elephants and provided financial support. Collaboration with specialists from progressive zoos like Detroit provides welcome information and educational benefits for all of us.

 

WANDA IN HER HABITAT: VIEW HERE

Out with the Asian elephants: VIEW HERE

Watch Wanda and Gypsy sleeping: VIEW HERE

Wanda and Gypsy eating reeds: VIEW HERE

 

 

In Memory of Winky

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WINKY (Asian Elephant, Elephas maximus)

IN MEMORIAM: 1952-2008

In the early morning hours of April 7, 2008, Winky, one of PAWS’ cherished Asian elephants, passed away peacefully. Born in 1952, Winky was one of the oldest elephants in the United States.

Arriving to her retirement at PAWS’ ARK 2000 sanctuary three years ago, almost to the day — April 8, 2005  — Winky made the long trip from Detroit to California with her long-time companion, Wanda. They had resided at the Detroit Zoo for approximately 17 years, until the decision was made to close their elephant exhibit. Prior to her stay in Detroit, Winky had lived at the Sacramento Zoo.

While Wanda quickly took to roaming the grassy hillside habitat of ARK 2000, Winky chose to spend her days basking in the sunshine, staying closer to her barn. “Perhaps it was because of all of the attention she received, or all of the treats she was given, at any rate, she wanted to stay close to home,” Pat Derby, PAWS’ founder, fondly recalls.

Winky had long suffered from joint problems. Her veterinarian from the Detroit Zoo was out to see her this weekend. According to her night keeper, at 3 a.m. she gently slid to her hind quarters and could not get up. The keeper immediately notified all elephant keepers and PAWS’ Directors, Pat Derby and Ed Stewart.

Urgent attempts were made to lift her, but she could not stand and support her back legs. She had three veterinarians in attendance while she was euthanized. Her companion, Wanda, choose to stay with her for some time.

“Winky was a wonderful girl. She was a sweet favorite of all of those who cared for her. She had a happy spring day yesterday — getting lots and lots of attention, and of course, lots of her special treats. We will all miss her terribly,” Derby added.

 



 

*PLEASE NOTE: Adoptions are symbolic only. The animal does not actually go home with you.

donations made via animal adoption are used for the care, feeding and maintenance of the animals.

 

PAWS
Performing Animal Welfare Society
PO Box 849, Galt, CA 95632

209/745-2606 office/sanctuary
209/745-1809 fax
info@pawsweb.org

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